Smile: Film review

You should know me by now… if there’s a horror film coming out. I am totally on that bandwagon. Last week was Jeepers Creepers: Reborn. But this week was Smile. I will try to write this review with no spoilers, but I can’t make any promises.

Firstly, I saw the trailer to this on multiple adverts for films, as well as YouTube and Facebook ads. I was intrigued by the premise of a smile, being used in a psychological horror. Though I felt like the trailer didn’t give much away. I also saw a variety of good reviews from press, and some people saying it’s not what you expect, coupled with an 18 age rating.

With nods to It Follows, this film is visually stunning. In my opinion one of the best horror films of 2022. Certainly a great depiction of mental health since Lights Out. A great cinematic production exploring, mental health, trauma, guilt and fear. Jump scares which rely on sound are placed perfectly throughout the film, with a few distressing scenes.

I thoroughly enjoyed it. And that’s a wrap on my short film review ๐Ÿ™‚ If you enjoyed it, I will write another for the next film.

~RebeccaKLxo

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Film review: Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2022

A fresh take on a classic horror.

If you follow me on Instagram, then you will know that Texas chainsaw massacre is my favourite horror film. It is very special to me. From watching the 1974 classic, and every remake and special edition made. To add to my sentiment of these films, they always say that you remember the first 18 film you see in the cinema. Well mine was Texas Chainsaw 3D, in 2013. If this doesn’t convince you I am a fan, then check out my collaboration with Photowall Sweden, called A little Serial

I must say Netflix is onto a winner with this sequel. It has truly made my day. Honestly it’s a little difficult to write a review, when I am this happy. Like there is so much consistent detailing, I am genuinely impressed. The iconic chainsaw, the story links, the face masks. Even the typical stupid mistakes teens in horror films makes. But it’s genius in 2022 to link it with social media.

To see the link with Sally Hardesty and the original, just warms my heart. It’s the clever details like that just makes me happy. Assuming the film is set in 2024, the details like 50 years later, is spot on. The overall gore as well, for it being on Netflix, did not hold back.

Without giving the full story away, the emotional rollercoaster I was taken on, I DID NOT expect. Even the ending was not expected.

I’d like to think Gunnar Hansen (Rest in Peace) would be proud.

What a lunchtime. I have had.

~RebeccaKLxo

The Invisible Man: Film Review

Nearly a month after its release date, I finally managed to get time to check out The Invisible Man in my local cinema. Accompanied with a cinema trip staple; the tango ice blast, mixed with the original 2 flavours.

Since viewing the trailer, I was intrigued. After all the synopsis was very compelling too me, from my past. Refer to mental health blog nov 2017. Itโ€™s a relatable story, and horror thrillers that could happen realistically in a future is always a big hit.

Itโ€™s a masterfully done portrayal of a domestic abuse survivor. The paranoia is very much real. It really brought back some bad memories. However I couldnโ€™t get over how well made the film is. Certainly worth the wait, from trailer to viewing.

Elisabeth Moss really excels within this lead role. As do the others, but her work just resonated with me. Although the story is a bit confusing, and Iโ€™ll be sure to go for a second viewing to straighten out my thoughts on this.

However as science and technology evolves, I could totally see invisibility being possible in the future. If trypophobia affects you, like it affects me, you might find parts of the film a little uncomfortable to watch. This is only down to the suit technology.

Itโ€™s certainly up there with my recommended films portraying mental health. Along with Lights Out and Unfriended. Definitely worth the watch for sure.

~Rebeccaklxo